Saturday, 21 March 2020

The Mysterious Psychology of Playing Roulette

I guess Ian Flemings' Casino Royale, starring James Bond 007 helped bring a touch of glamour to roulette. Originally written in 1953, the 2006 film, starring Daniel Craig, was very well received in many critics' Top 10 Lists.

For many punters, they simply rely on Lady Luck. However, is there any psychological underpinning to why people love to bet at the roulette table?

The main reason we love to play roulette is due to dopamine, the pleasure neurotransmitter in the old grey matter that's your brain (if you didn't know). Dopamine is released whenever we do something pleasurable so I suggest you draw up a list. Also, more in keeping with gambling, when something is uncertain that may have a favourable outcome. 

Just like a big stack of chips on the number 23 red. 

Interestingly, a near miss on the roulette, perhaps number 10 black if you are betting on 23 red, even though a loss (boo hoo) is more pleasurable than a big miss.   

It inspires you to carry on gambling...

How many times have you said: ''That was close?'' ''The bloody ball just bounced out of 23'' 

''BLEEP''

You probably bring your own personal psychology to roulette in the sense that you may have a favoured number (15th in my pet dog's birthday), you may have green fingers so go for the colour green and number (zero). 

In a way, playing roulette is similar to taking drugs because it taps into the dopamine pathways of pleasure. 

Playing online, where you have the opportunity to spin the wheel actually adds the addictive nature. Another reason why online slot machines are very addictive. 

Unlike playing poker you are in essence playing against yourself with roulette...all those internal influences and ''Lady Luck'' who you are sure isn't far away. 

In truth, your fate relies on the spin of a wheel, numbers (0 - 36) and just three colours (red, black and green). 

Where will the ball stop?